Addiction and Pre-Mature Birth

Recent Blogs
Events
CONTACT US
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

MCH_premature-baby

Researchers from King’s College London examined the hospital records of 10,000 people who were admitted for depression, psychosis, bipolar disorder, eating disorders and alcohol or drug addiction. They found that in adulthood, people who had been born very prematurely (less than 32 weeks gestation) were three times as likely to experience depression, 7.4 times as likely to have bipolar disorder, 2.5 times as likely to suffer from psychosis, and 3.5 times as likely to develop an eating disorder. Those born moderately prematurely (33 to 36 weeks early) had 1.3 times the chance of suffering from depression, 2.7 times the chance of having bipolar disorder, and 1.6 times the chance of psychosis.

Many women who struggle with the disease of addiction also struggle when they become pregnant. Unfortunately, addiction is a disease that is life long, and ultimately fatal, and finding out that you are pregnant is not always enough to arrest the disease. Some women continue in their substance abuse, which impacts the life of their unborn child. However, if this is the case, immediate action is necessary. Without a decision to begin their recovery journey the child is at serious risk, and could possibly be prematurely born. Some women think they can just quit drinking or abusing drugs. The truth is that most women need some form of help. New Directions for Women wants to help women to have a healthy birth and help unborn children to have a healthy life.

Statistics indicate that approximately 4 percent of all pregnant women in the United States abuse illegal drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, or methamphetamines. Although it is commonly believed that illicit drug use is linked to an increase in premature birth, exact statistics are difficult to find since the majority of women who use illegal drugs during pregnancy, also drink alcohol and/or smoke cigarettes. Technology has not found a way to accurately assess the cause due to combined substance use.

Women and families should not take this information lightly. The more quickly you seek help the better it is for your unborn child. At New Directions for Women we take pride in offering expertise and support during this difficult time. We have exclusively been serving women for nearly four decades and have helped many pregnant women transform their lives for themselves and their loved ones. Many healthy children have been born while their mother was in treatment at our facility.  New Directions for Women offers the same option to women, children and families who desire a similar result. Know a pregnant woman or someone who needs treatment? Contact our loving Admissions Counselors at 800-93-WOMEN or find us on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. We can help.

Don’t forget to share this post!
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Call Now Button